Displaying items by tag: behind the scenes

If you don’t remember (or never saw) Ibsen’s original A DOLL'S HOUSE, don’t worry: there’s absolutely no need to study up on the 140-year-old Norwegian play to enjoy PART 2. Even if you are familiar, here are some facts about the setting:IMG 8107Plaque marking the former site of Henrik Ibsen's apartment in Bergen, Norway. Photo: Joshua Black

• Nora, hitherto an extremely submissive wife, left her husband Torvald and their 3 children at the end of the first play
• Divorce was practically unheard of then. Only 7 cases were recorded in the 1880s in Norway, a country of 2.2 million people
• Protestant sensibility, in an effort to combat some of the effects of industrialization, had made the marriage contract and the family unit priority number one in civilized society
• There were very few rights for women in Norway (or Europe, or America for that matter) at the time. A woman was considered her father’s property until she was married, at which time she became the property of her husband

The moment Nora leaves her husband and family is the most famous part of the original story, and has been referred to as “the door slam heard round the world.” Nora’s actions in the play reverberated in the hearts of audiences, for good or for ill, and ushered in a cultural shift that had been brewing at the time – and that we’re still trying to figure out how to live with today.

When the original play premiered, audiences were shocked. They weren’t even used to hearing a play performed with realistic dialogue (they were used to metered verse at the theatre), let alone seeing a woman who shakes off her most sacred duties to marriage, family, and a happy ending. No one expected to see Nora slam the door on Torvald and her children – but slam it she did, sending a shockwave of realization, and action, on the part of oppressed women in Western society.

So sit back, and enjoy the continuing conversation – it’s one we’re still discussing, and likely will be for, oh, at least 20 or 30 more years.

- Heather Nowlin, 

Dramaturg, A DOLL'S HOUSE, PART 2

 

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Published in Blog & News

Kathleen Cahill's world premiere Jazz Age romance runs April 10 through May 12th

Salt Lake Acting Company presents the world premiere of SILENT DANCER by Utah-based playwright, Kathleen Cahill, beginning April 10th. The play recieves its premiere following several developmental workshops both at SLAC (including a New Play Sounding Series reading in March, 2017) and Sacramento’s B Street Theatre.

Set in the tumultuous world of Manhattan in the 1920’s, SILENT DANCER is being billed as a “groundbreaking dance/play/romance about dangerous love, secret identities, criminals, silent movies, and the most famous couple in New York.” In it, Cahill populates an original story about an aspiring dancer with real-life historical figures—F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, as well as infamous gangster Jackie “Legs” Diamond.

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Mikki Reeve as Rosie Quinn in SILENT DANCER. Photo: Joshua Black

Costume Designer: Nancy Hills | Assistant Costume Designer: Ally Thieme

 

SILENT DANCER runs April 10 through May 12. Tickets can be obtained via tickets.saltlakeactingcompany.org, in person at the SLAC box office, or by calling 801.363.7522. 

Published in Blog & News